Reviews

Written for Everything Theatre

Perhaps the classic American musical from the fifties, Guys and Dolls is nevertheless one of those shows that doesn’t come around that often, so I was surprised but pleased to see it pop up only a few years after Chichester Festival Theatre production’s successful run in the West End and on tour.

Written for Everything Theatre

Boujie (an abbreviation of bourgeoisie, AKA middle class) is the first show by Unshaded Arts, a new theatre company that aims to tell relatable stories from the perspective of people who are not part of the majority. The company’s debut focuses on successful entertainment blogger Devin, who is having a housewarming party at his swanky new flat and has invited his best friends: stressed out nurse Dahlia, coasting council worker Joslyn, and disgruntled City boy Courtney who has just quit his banking job on a whim. Each is struggling with their own personal and professional difficulties, but all is going well until the party is crashed by posho neighbour Giles and Devin’s slightly unhinged sister Giselle. And with money suddenly becoming the topic of conversation, the friends find out they don’t know one another as well as they might have thought.

Written for Everything Theatre

I was pleasantly surprised by my very first outing to the Park Theatre for the UK premiere of The Other Place, directed by Claire van Kampen. The Park Theatre is one of those venues I always intended to get to some time, and then never did, until last night. Modern, comfortable, and only a couple minutes’ walk from Finsbury Park station, I would definitely recommend paying it a visit. (Also, they have pizza. Why don’t more theatres do pizza? It’s two of my favourite things in the world, combined.)

Written for Everything Theatre

A Pocketful of Bread was written in 1984 by Romanian playwright Matei Visniec, and this production at Ovalhouse marks the play’s English-language premiere. Over the course of 45 minutes, it follows Man with Hat and Man with Stick as they try to decide what to do about the situation they have happened upon: a dog stuck at the bottom of a well. The two men rage at the cruelty of humankind, bicker about the best method to go down into the well and contemplate whether or not the dog actually wants to be saved, but end up doing nothing other than throwing down some bits of bread.

Written for Calder Theatre

Three women find out, with varying degrees of enthusiasm, that they’re pregnant. In the next 75 minutes, Doll’s Eye Theatre’s Birth Right takes us through the ups and downs of pregnancy, from One Born Every Minute to interfering strangers. Kay’s unplanned pregnancy threatens to mess up her plans to attend university; Sal finds herself overwhelmed by the amount of advice for expecting mothers; and Donna navigates the perils of being a woman of ‘advanced maternal age’.