Reviews

Written for Everything Theatre

I was pleasantly surprised by my very first outing to the Park Theatre for the UK premiere of The Other Place, directed by Claire van Kampen. The Park Theatre is one of those venues I always intended to get to some time, and then never did, until last night. Modern, comfortable, and only a couple minutes’ walk from Finsbury Park station, I would definitely recommend paying it a visit. (Also, they have pizza. Why don’t more theatres do pizza? It’s two of my favourite things in the world, combined.)

Written for Everything Theatre

A Pocketful of Bread was written in 1984 by Romanian playwright Matei Visniec, and this production at Ovalhouse marks the play’s English-language premiere. Over the course of 45 minutes, it follows Man with Hat and Man with Stick as they try to decide what to do about the situation they have happened upon: a dog stuck at the bottom of a well. The two men rage at the cruelty of humankind, bicker about the best method to go down into the well and contemplate whether or not the dog actually wants to be saved, but end up doing nothing other than throwing down some bits of bread.

Written for Calder Theatre

Three women find out, with varying degrees of enthusiasm, that they’re pregnant. In the next 75 minutes, Doll’s Eye Theatre’s Birth Right takes us through the ups and downs of pregnancy, from One Born Every Minute to interfering strangers. Kay’s unplanned pregnancy threatens to mess up her plans to attend university; Sal finds herself overwhelmed by the amount of advice for expecting mothers; and Donna navigates the perils of being a woman of ‘advanced maternal age’.

Written for Everything Theatre

Iris Theatre’s shows at Saint Paul’s Church in Covent Garden, also affectionately known as the Actor’s Church, are one of those fixtures of the summer theatre calendar. After a foray into darker realms last year with Macbeth, the company is back on familiar, family-friendly ground with The Three Musketeers.

Written for Everything Theatre

I will be the first person to admit that, after spending the day in a hot, crowded office, the prospect of seeing a show about two people trapped in very close confines did not fill me with unadulterated joy. Fortunately, the Tristan Bates Theatre is one of those rare beasts – a fringe theatre that doesn’t get hotter than the face of the sun in summer – so my initial misgivings were quickly soothed.