Theatred

Reviews

Written for Everything Theatre

It’s 1921 and, after four years of war and a flu pandemic, Death is pretty fed up with his (for lack of a better word) life. Intrigued as to why humans fear him so much, he decides to take the weekend off and spend it with the Lamberti family to study their ways. Under the guise of the Russian prince Nikolai Sirki, Death learns about life as he falls in love with the Lambertis’ daughter Grazia.

Written for Everything Theatre

Another show, another bar. After a successful debut earlier this year at Paradise by Way of Kensal Green, immersive theatre company UnCorked have taken up residency at Evans and Peel Detective Agency for their latest venture, One Nine Two Seven. For those of you not in the know: this is a highly appropriate venue, because Evans and Peel is a proper New York underground Prohibition-era boozer (but in Earls Court). And One Nine Two Seven is a proper old school gangster classic (but as a theatre show).

Written for Everything Theatre

Much Ado About Nothing is without doubt one of Shakespeare’s more popular plays, and this particular incarnation was a successful venture for the Royal Shakespeare Company when it premiered two years ago. Teamed up with Love’s Labour’s Lost, this Much Ado (or Love’s Labour’s Won, as the RSC also call it) is set in the early 20th century. Whereas the first play is set before the First World War, the latter sees the soldiers just returning from the front. Perhaps that sounds a bit grim, but don’t worry: director Christopher Luscombe keeps things (mostly) firmly comedic.

Jeeves and Wooster: they probably don’t need much of an introduction. P.G. Wodehouse’s jolly but dim aristocrat Bertie Wooster and his unflappable valet Jeeves have been a successful duo in print, on TV and, since two years ago, in the theatre. Writers David and Robert Goodale had a proper hit on their hands when their play opened in the West End three years ago, with Stephen Mangan and Matthew Macfayden in the leads. And now Tower Theatre Company have brought Jeeves and Wooster’s adventures to the Bridewell Theatre, for anyone who missed the hype the first time round.

Written for Everything Theatre

It doesn’t happen often that you walk into an auditorium and are personally welcomed by the performer doing the show. Yet, Shôn Dale-Jones does exactly that just before the start of his one-man show The Duke at the Royal Court’s small theatre upstairs. It sets the tone perfectly for a very personal 60 minutes, in which Dale-Jones talks about three things: the process of finishing up a film script he’s worked on for ten years, the aftermath of his mother accidentally breaking a porcelain figure of the Duke of Wellington, and the refugee crisis.