Theatred

Reviews

Written for Everything Theatre

I was vaguely regretting my choice to sign up for this show as soon as I entered Selfridges and came face to face with the wall of beautiful people and £60 hand-origami-ed tea bags that stood between the ‘pop up’ theatre space on the lower ground floor and my manifestly uncool self. Fortunately, I did not turn around and flee back into the safe arms of H&M. Because if I had, I would’ve missed this very shiny but entertaining production of a Shakespeare classic by emerging theatre company The Faction.

Written for Everything Theatre

What do thirteen 13-year-old girls, one male bodybuilder and one plastic unicorn have in common? Well, they’re all in my new favourite show.

Written for Everything Theatre

Two things in life I love very much are immersive theatre and a good murder mystery. So How to Solve a Problem Like Murder, advertised as ‘Cluedo meets the seven deadly sins’, seemed to be made for me. I’m not, however, a massive fan of the imperious way in which some immersive theatre companies treat their audience members (looking at you, Punchdrunk). That’s why I got a bit worried when, shortly after arrival, my plus one and I were handed masks, along with the instruction that we had to wear them at all times. Oh, and we weren’t allowed to talk either. It was all very Drowned Man.

Written for Everything Theatre

Daniel Foxsmith’s new play Weald introduces the audience to two men: Sam is the fifty-something owner of a livery stable somewhere in rural England, Jim is the 25 year old lad who has come back home from London and wants a few weeks work. Jim has worked for Sam, who is something of a surrogate father to him, before, but the two didn’t part ways amicably last time. Nevertheless, Sam decides to give him another shot. What follows is a good hour of friendly teasing, a lot of beating around the bush and the occasional frustrated outburst as the men try to figure out how to actually talk to each other about the things that matter to them.

Written for Everything Theatre

Girl meets boy. Boy thinks girl is barely tolerable. Girl thinks boy is a stuck-up git. A couple of hundred pages later, they’re married. If ever there was a piece of the literary cannon waiting to be turned into a pantomime, it surely was this one.