Theatred

Reviews

Written for Everything Theatre

Daniel Foxsmith’s new play Weald introduces the audience to two men: Sam is the fifty-something owner of a livery stable somewhere in rural England, Jim is the 25 year old lad who has come back home from London and wants a few weeks work. Jim has worked for Sam, who is something of a surrogate father to him, before, but the two didn’t part ways amicably last time. Nevertheless, Sam decides to give him another shot. What follows is a good hour of friendly teasing, a lot of beating around the bush and the occasional frustrated outburst as the men try to figure out how to actually talk to each other about the things that matter to them.

Written for Everything Theatre

Girl meets boy. Boy thinks girl is barely tolerable. Girl thinks boy is a stuck-up git. A couple of hundred pages later, they’re married. If ever there was a piece of the literary cannon waiting to be turned into a pantomime, it surely was this one.

Richard III: 15th century, hunch-backed Frank Underwood or a pretty decent guy? In Good King Richard the clue is in the title, and Golden Age Theatre Company set to work to rid the much-maligned monarch of the lingering reputation Shakespeare bestowed on him. Through flashbacks we see Richard’s rise to power, from protector of the north to reluctant king, and the problems he faces. While his brother’s scheming wife Queen Elizabeth tries to create confusion in the ranks and liaises with France, Richard tries to do the best for the people of England, even if that might end up costing him the support of the rich lords and ladies.

Written for Everything Theatre

Mental health. It’s not a particularly sexy topic. It IS a particularly complex one. These two qualities leave no doubt as to why it’s not exactly a beloved subject among theatre makers, or anyone in the arts really. It’s hard to get it right, and very easy to get it wrong. But greater understanding can only come from trying (and, occasionally, failing), which is why it’s very important that people like playwright/director Chris Mayo take it on anyway.  

Written for Everything Theatre

Double bill Lost and Boundless is the very first performance from the newly formed contemporary dance group Genesis Ballet Company. Founder and artistic director Ricardo Cecílio has used his own experiences in creating the first piece of the evening; Lost is about losing sight of your goals, wavering and, finally, finding your way back. Cecílio’s second offering, Boundless, is far less abstract, presenting the audience with a different take on Romeo and Juliet. In it, we see the young lovers miraculously arise from their faked deaths and encounter the difficulties that come with having the actual normal-people relationship the Bard never let them have a crack at.