Reviews

Written for Everything Theatre

Ramps on the Moon is a long-term collaboration between a number of theatres and theatre companies that aim to create shows that are accessible by and inclusive of people who are d/Deaf, disabled and visually impaired. On their latest outing, The Who’s 1969 rock opera is given a vigorous makeover that mercilessly ties the story, starting in WWII, to the present day.

Written for Everything Theatre

I’ll happily admit that I put my name down for Death of the King purely on the basis of its summary: ‘an immersive punk murder mystery’. It’s an unlikely combination for sure, but in the hands of immersive theatre company ImmerCity, it does not disappoint.

Written for Everything Theatre

Thank god for air conditioning. On one of the hottest days of the year so far, I would normally not be looking forward to spending my evening in a tiny black box theatre above a pub. The Finborough Theatre, however, is one of those rare gems that have both excellent programming and excellent aircon. (All hail the Finborough Ice Dragon, who, by the way, has his own Twitter account.)

Written for Everything Theatre

Probably the best known of John Webster’s plays, The Duchess of Malfi has everything you’d expect from a Jacobean revenge tragedy: incest, corruption, madness and a rather spectacular body count. You’ve guessed it, you’re not in for a cheerful evening with this new production by Scena Mundi.

Written for Everything Theatre

Half a Sixpence is a classic rags-to-riches affair, a new and improved take on the original 1963 musical that was written for teenage heartthrob Tommy Steele. Set in the early twentieth century, it tells the story of draper’s apprentice Artie Kipps and his attempts to blend in with ‘civilised society’ after he unexpectedly inherits a fortune. You probably don’t need my help to figure out where this is going, but then again, I don’t think anyone would go see this show primarily for the plot. I’m not saying it’s not entertaining – it is – and behind its wholesome exterior lies an unexpectedly large amount of dirty jokes, which made me very happy. But what sells this show are the catchy songs, the nearly acrobatic dancing and, of course, Charlie Stemp’s fantastic performance as Artie.