Theatred

Reviews

Written for Everything Theatre

London boasts some very fine theatres, but it difficult to think of one more perfect to spend a beautiful summer’s evening at than Regent’s Park Open Air Theatre. Equipped with a large bar, a barbecue and a liberal sprinkling of fairy lights, it’s a wonderfully secluded spot right in central London. Currently it’s home to Seven Brides for Seven Brothers, which centres on Oregon mountain man Adam Pontipee, who comes riding into town looking for a wife to clothe and feed him and his six younger brothers. When he meets waitress Milly the deal is quickly sealed, but events take an unexpected turn when Milly finds out about her new brothers-in-law, and decides to introduce them to women and civilisation.

Written for Everything Theatre

London has a new theatre! At least, that’s how the clever people at Hackney Showroom advertise themselves. This lead to mild confusion on my part when, after nicely following the route Google Maps had spit out, I found myself standing outside a venue I recognised as Hackney Downs Studios. But, with a new name, setup and a fresh lick of paint, this section of the studios does look and feel very much like a new theatre indeed, and where better to go for some fresh new writing?

Written for Everything Theatre

Although entirely on the wrong side of the river for my liking, I never mind taking a trip to Theatre503 in Battersea: it’s a friendly theatre-above-a-pub with good legroom and challenging, relevant programming. Lightbox Theatre’s The Air Around Us fits that bill, particularly for locals, since it’s a ‘spinoff’ from the company’s earlier production Battersea Odyssey. For that project, 120 inhabitants told Lightbox about their lives in Battersea. George Cresswell’s story, however, stood out from the rest, and has now been turned into a separate, verbatim play. In The Air Around Us, the audience gets to peek into Cresswell’s life, from his early memories as a dirt poor child living through the Second World War to joining the RAF, starting a family and buying his own house.

Written for Everything Theatre

Who doesn’t love a birthday party? The people at the Richard Alston Dance Company certainly do; turning 20 this year, the company has put together a marvellous mix of old favourites and new work to celebrate.

Written for Everything Theatre

I’m a bit of a sucker for a nice church. So, by choosing the very old and formidable-looking St Bartholomew the Great in Smithfield as their venue, Scena Mundi already had me on board with their Edward II as soon as I walked in. Fortunately, the great location isn’t the only aspect of this production that commands the attention.