Reviews

Written for Everything Theatre

Seeing a show at Battersea Arts Centre is always a bit of an adventure: you know it’s going to be interesting, but you can never be quite sure what exactly you’re going to get. This was much the same for my evening there last night, of which I only knew it would involve karaoke and hip hop Hamlet.

Written for Everything Theatre

You can always count on the people at Vault Festival to serve up an eclectic programme, and this year they might just have outdone themselves. Example: Summer Nights in Space, which is billed as a ‘new glam rock space musical’. It sounded like a (more) sci-fi version of The Rocky Horror Show, so I was immediately intrigued.

Written for Everything Theatre

It’s 1921 and, after four years of war and a flu pandemic, Death is pretty fed up with his (for lack of a better word) life. Intrigued as to why humans fear him so much, he decides to take the weekend off and spend it with the Lamberti family to study their ways. Under the guise of the Russian prince Nikolai Sirki, Death learns about life as he falls in love with the Lambertis’ daughter Grazia.

Written for Everything Theatre

Another show, another bar. After a successful debut earlier this year at Paradise by Way of Kensal Green, immersive theatre company UnCorked have taken up residency at Evans and Peel Detective Agency for their latest venture, One Nine Two Seven. For those of you not in the know: this is a highly appropriate venue, because Evans and Peel is a proper New York underground Prohibition-era boozer (but in Earls Court). And One Nine Two Seven is a proper old school gangster classic (but as a theatre show).

Written for Everything Theatre

Much Ado About Nothing is without doubt one of Shakespeare’s more popular plays, and this particular incarnation was a successful venture for the Royal Shakespeare Company when it premiered two years ago. Teamed up with Love’s Labour’s Lost, this Much Ado (or Love’s Labour’s Won, as the RSC also call it) is set in the early 20th century. Whereas the first play is set before the First World War, the latter sees the soldiers just returning from the front. Perhaps that sounds a bit grim, but don’t worry: director Christopher Luscombe keeps things (mostly) firmly comedic.