Theatred

Reviews

Written for Everything Theatre

The Vagina Monologues is pretty much what says on the tin: a series of monologues concerning a range of topics relating to women and sex. Originally written in 1996 by Eve Ensler, it’s based on interviews with over 200 women. It’s also a permanent work in progress: Ensler frequently adds new pieces that address contemporary debates. This means that whenever you see a staging of the play, it’ll be a surprise in terms of which monologues are included and in what order they’re performed.

Written for Everything Theatre

Theatre lovers, rejoice: you have an unparalleled range of plays about Romeo to choose from right now. While the traditionalists may content themselves with an old-fashioned ‘and Juliet’, those of a more adventurous spirit can head over to Shakespeare in Love to see the makings of the tragically doomed Romeo and Ethel the Pirate’s Daughter. And if you really like your classics with a twist, you can have a go at Fentiman’s Romeo and Rosaline.

Written for Everything Theatre

The people at the Unicorn Theatre are a brave bunch. If they weren’t, they wouldn’t have given their stage to Amy Leach and her nearly three hour long production of Brecht’s The Caucasian Chalk Circle, aimed at children of eleven and over. As it does in the play though, bravery certainly pays off.

Written for Everything Theatre

2015 has barely begun, but we only need to look at the London stages to know that it’s an election year. There’s plenty of exciting stuff lined up later this year, like James Graham and Josie Rourke’s live TV event The Vote at the Donmar Warehouse. Just closed at the Royal Court last week, Hope is a play about the pragmatism versus idealism dilemma for Labour party members under a Tory government. And now we have Upper Cut at Southwark Playhouse, which is about, erm, the pragmatism versus idealism dilemma for Labour party members under a Tory government.

Written for Everything Theatre

You have to hand it to whoever thought it up: it’s a stroke of marketing genius to sell Shakespeare through the connection with the popular HBO series Game of Thrones. HVI: Play of Thrones is an adaptation of Shakespeare’s Henry VI plays, of which those familiar with the Bard’s work will know, there are three. Packing a day’s worth of theatre into one two and a half hour show is an ambitious venture at least. If anyone could do it though, I was convinced it would be director and adaptation genius Phil Willmott. He is, after all, the one who gave us a brilliant version of Wagner’s Ring Cycle, a grand total of four operas squeezed into a single evening, this summer at More London. As it turns out, I was mistaken.