Reviews

Written for Everything Theatre

The Puppet Theatre Barge is a special little something: a floating puppet theatre that’s moored in charming Little Venice most of the year, and sets sail for Richmond in summer. As far as atmosphere goes, there’s no theatre like it; never before felt a visiting a show quite so much like going on a mini-vacation. The seating is remarkably spacious, although anyone taller than the average twelve-year-old gets a good bit of exercise in trying to get to their seat without banging their head. It’s all part of the charm though: you do want to notice you’re on a boat after all.

Written for Everything Theatre

It could have been called the Self Help Trilogy. In one evening performer Ed Rapley takes his audience through a lifetime’s worth of fears and failures, and the shows he wrote to try and overcome them. The evening starts with 10 Ways To Die On Stage, Rapley’s first show, in which he talks about childhood memories and adult unhappiness. The second show, conveniently titled The MiddleBit, deals with depression. Last on the programme is Who Knows Where, in which we get to know Ed’s metaphorical shoulder angel and devil, and also his old French drama teacher.

Written for Everything Theatre

My first thought after walking out of the Bush Theatre auditorium at the end of this show was that already I regretted offering to review it. We Are Proud to Present a Presentation About the Herero of Namibia, Formerly Known As Southwest Africa, from the German Sudwest Afrika, Between the Years 1884-1915, as the full title goes, is one of the most intriguing, provocative, jumbled and confusing pieces I’ve seen in quite some time, and somehow seems to defy being made sense of. But here goes…

Written for Everything Theatre

'Come in, sit down. This is my mate Phil. Would anyone like a biscuit?’ While this may sound like I spent last night on a friend’s sofa, these were actually the words with which writer and performer Paul Cree welcomed his audience to his one man show A Tale From The Bedsit. Sitting in a corner of his recreated room, Cree talks about moving away from his childhood home to Brighton in the hopes of making it there in the music industry. All the classic ingredients of a coming-of-age story are there: love and heartbreak, the struggle to make it on your own, kind friends and cruel authority figures. Think modern day, one man version of The Breakfast Club.

Written for Everything Theatre

What happened after Frodo destroyed the ring and Luke defeated the Empire? The classics traditionally take three instalments to document The Quest, and then end with one short chapter that neatly wraps everything up into a suitably happy ending. Théâtre Libre have chosen to do things a bit differently: their Hero shows what happens after the world has been saved.