Reviews

Written for Everything Theatre

It will probably not have escaped your notice that we have a very special anniversary to ‘celebrate’ this year: the centenary of the First World War. Cinemas, tv stations and theatres will without a doubt provide their audiences with plenty of opportunities to look at ‘the war to end all wars’ from every possible perspective, but already it’s hard to imagine they’ll be able to deliver a piece that’s more poignant and hard-hitting than Terry Johnson’s revival of Oh What A Lovely War.

Written for Everything Theatre

‘Best of’ shows are tricky things to pull off. The recipe seems simple enough. Step one: take your most talented performers. Step two: have them sing your catchiest hits. Step three: watch auditorium explode with magnificence. On the other hand, there’s a lot that can go wrong as well. Dangerous adjectives like ‘self-indulgent’ and ‘repetitious’ lurk around every familiar turn. Interval Productions, rather in keeping with their name, delivers a show that’s stuck somewhere on that middle ground between awful and awesome.

Written for UNDERCULTURE

Beckett. I like to imagine his name being accompanied by a theme tune. Possibly something along the lines of Darth Vader’s personal intro. Beckett. Go on, say it out loud. Can you feel the chill running down your spine as the name leaves your mouth? I know I can. Who’s afraid of Virginia Woolf? I’m afraid of Samuel Beckett.

Written for Everything Theatre

Okay, I’ll be honest here. I was not overly enthusiastic when I read the subtitle of this show: The Tragedy of a Woman Who Gave Birth to a Grizzly Bear. In fact, the first connection I made was with questionable films like Mega Shark versus Giant Octopus. And in spite of their high entertainment value, that is not a favourable comparison. But occasionally you come across shows that take you completely by surprise, and I’m happy to report that Bear is one of those.

Written for Everything Theatre

While I completely support the idea of festivals, be it music, theatre or otherwise, they can be a bit of a hassle. For one, they usually involve three-page, colour-coded, cross-referencing schedules that are completely unreadable on the screen of your phone. Also, lots of walking. Fortunately church-turned-theatre The Space has decided to give their 2013 invention The One Festival another go this year. In one evening you get to see between three and five solo performances by young talent. No choosing, so no complicated schedules, and the only walking you have to do is up the stairs to the bar and back. Easy peasy.