Reviews

Written for Everything Theatre

What happened after Frodo destroyed the ring and Luke defeated the Empire? The classics traditionally take three instalments to document The Quest, and then end with one short chapter that neatly wraps everything up into a suitably happy ending. Théâtre Libre have chosen to do things a bit differently: their Hero shows what happens after the world has been saved.

Written for Everything Theatre

This year Lazarus Theatre is one of the many theatre companies celebrating the 450th anniversary of Shakespeare’s birth, and their Richard III is a party you’ll want to be invited to. Generally considered to be one of Shakespeare’s finest works, the play chronicles the rise to power of the Machiavellian Richard, who is tired of standing in the shadow of his brother King Edward IV. Carefully picking at the barely-healed scabs of the War of the Roses, and cleverly pitting his family members against one another, Richard plots his way to the throne. But bad karma isn’t scared off by a shiny crown, and Richard grows ever more paranoid as his enemies close in on him.

Written for Everything Theatre

Locations for site-specific theatre come in many shapes, sizes, and levels of comfort, but it’s not often you come across luxury hotels being used for this purpose. This month though, theatre companies are going upscale, with The Hotel Plays on at the Langham and Dante or Die’s I Do at the Hilton Docklands.

Written for UNDERCULTURE

Adrian Lester reprises his role as Ira Aldridge/Othello, and meanwhile delivers a lesson in the do’s and oh-God-please-don’ts of acting in Red Velvet. Indhu Rubashingham started off her tenure as Artistic Director of the Tricycle Theatre in 2012 with this new play by Lolita Chakrabarti. As far as entrances go, this was the Arnold Schwarzenegger: not so much kicking in the door as shooting it down with a rocket launcher. It was clear: the Tricycle was going bring National Theatre quality to Kilburn. She managed it, quite literally, with Lester playing the lead. And now, the play is back.

Written for Everything Theatre

It will probably not have escaped your notice that we have a very special anniversary to ‘celebrate’ this year: the centenary of the First World War. Cinemas, tv stations and theatres will without a doubt provide their audiences with plenty of opportunities to look at ‘the war to end all wars’ from every possible perspective, but already it’s hard to imagine they’ll be able to deliver a piece that’s more poignant and hard-hitting than Terry Johnson’s revival of Oh What A Lovely War.