Reviews

Written for Everything Theatre

As someone who has recently moved to the UK, there are a few theatre events that I would class as very British. One of those would be seeing Shakespeare at the Globe. Another is pantomime at a pub theatre. As it happens, Twisted Dame’s Sleeping Beauty is playing at one of those traditional pub downstairs, theatre upstairs combinations: the cosy Hen and Chickens Theatre Bar in Islington.

Written for Everything Theatre

Seeing a site-specific show is always a bit of an adventure. First, there’s the challenge of getting to the location. Directionally challenged as I am, this can sometimes be rather off-putting, especially when you end up at least two buses away from a decent Wi-Fi signal. Then the venue and amenities also vary. Sometimes you end up standing around in a field desperately wishing you’d put on that extra jumper. Or that you hadn’t had that cup of tea just before you left. Fortunately Old Cholmeley Boys’ Club is a very manageable five minutes away from Dalston Overground station. It also turns out to be warm, and furnished with toilets as well as plenty of chairs. In short, it’s site-specific theatre that’s also suitable for those of us who don’t like to suffer for art.

Written for UNDERCULTURE

Have ever wondered what the result would be if Arthur Miller and Frank Sinatra made a musical together and then had it performed by a New York version of Jimmy Carr? Well, neither had I, but I’m pretty sure it would look something like No Place To Go.

Written for Everything Theatre

‘What’s in a name?’ As a great lover of Shakespeare this is a quote that popped into my head on hearing I was going to review a show at a theatre called Chickenshed. Fortunately I can say that in this case the answer to that question is: not a lot. Quite contrary to what the name might suggest, Chickenshed is a good-sized, well-equipped theatre, run by friendly people. Don’t let its location at the end of the Piccadilly line scare you off: 45 minutes is all it takes to get back to central London. This is easily made up for by the fact it’s more spacious than a lot of theatres closer to the city centre.

Written for UNDERCULTURE

After Antonioni Project and Roman Tragedies, this is the third time the Barbican welcomes Dutch theatre company Toneelgroep Amsterdam and its artistic director Ivo van Hove. Quite fittingly so, as the number three turns out to play a major part in this adaption of Ingmar Bergman’s Scenes From A Marriage.